Stuff'n'things
nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:


Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.
I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

nprbooks:

If you haven’t read Emily Carroll’s shiveringly glorious Through the Woods, our reviewer Amal El-Mohtar recommends you do so immediately:’

In these five graphic tales (meaning comics, not stories told in Grand Guignol fashion — although that linguistic line is definitely blurred here),Carroll’s sinuous prose and emphatic art blend seamlessly into a path through the stories she tells. If there is a key to this collection, it is the phrase “It came from the woods. (Most strange things do),” which recurs in “His Face All Red,” the story of a man who murders his brother only to see him emerge from the woods whole, happy, and unscathed. These are tales of strange things that come from or go into the woods — and what they did to people, or had done to them, along the way.

"His Face All Red" is actually available online — but if you want to see what exactly this lady is running from, you’ll have to get the book:

Through the Woods is complex without being opaque; these are all still clear, deceptively simple stories that are kissing-close to beginning with “once upon a time.” They’re stories about girls who lose a father to the winter, a mother to sickness, a friend to a ghost; they’re stories told as straightforwardly as fairy tale while containing all the rich density of poetry.

I am still not a reader of horror. But I am a reader of poetry, of folk and fairy tales, of dark fantasy, and a frequent wanderer of woods — and as such, I am most certainly a reader of Carroll. 

asylum-art:

Ryohei Hase Artworks 

 on deviantART

In Japan, the word “cute” or kawaii can be stamped on just about everything when it comes to aesthetics. Cute dogs, dolls, cartoons and cars are the accepted standard. Now picture human bodies with wolf heads tearing each other apart. Pigs crowded around a dinner table salivating over their roasted brethren. Japanese artist and Tokyo resident Ryohei Hase illustrates beautifully disturbing scenes with obsessive detail. Cannibalism is at times a running theme in his work. Using Photoshop and other software, Hase creates digital art that almost challenges traditional painting if not coexisting without notice. Take a look at some of his work below.

thepeoplesrecord:

marxism-leninism-maoism:

marxism-leninism-maoism:

Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today.

— Malcolm X

This is the proud culmination of many, many, hours of work. I’ve spent days reading, compiling, archiving, and sorting over 460 educational links into one centralized resource. It covers topics, simple to complex, on the following subjects:

  • Class
  • Feminism
  • Race
  • Trans
  • Sexuality
  • Disability
  • General Social Justice

List of Educational Resources

If anyone has any links or improvements they’d like to add, put it in my inbox or add a comment on one of the pages. All contributions are welcome, but I’m mostly looking to improve the ‘sexuality’ page as there are only 5 links there :(

VERY COOL! I’d love to see a list of resources as related to colonialism and imperialism as well…no idea what icons would be appropriate. 

xhumhallelujahx:

bryarly:

writingnotebooks:

Ooooh, I LOVE this question!
Lots of people keep journals with systematic diary entries, but I understand that it doesn’t work for everyone.
Here are some cool/interesting/fun/motivational/productive things you can do that don’t necessarily include keeping a diary:
Turn a Moleskine (or other notebook) into a planner/organizer/PDA/productivity system
52 lists
30 Days of Lists
Answer "50 Questions That Will Free Your Mind"
Start a gratitude journal
Create a "life handbook"
Keep morning pages
Start a scrapbook
Use journal prompts to answer questions when you feel like it
Participate in the 7-week Life Cleanse
Keep these 9 lists updated — REALLY useful things to keep track of!
Take notes as you learn something new
Use a notebook to keep track of goal-setting and productivity: 60 Ways to Improve Your Life in 100 Days
Keep a recipe book
Keep a reading journal/movie journal/music journal/fashion journal
Start a quote book
Make a travel journal — use it to plan your trip/vacation, then glue in transportation ticket stubs, itineraries, maps, photographs, dinner receipts at fancy restaurants, and write about your adventures
Doodle in it
Write poetry
Cut out and glue pretty pictures
Create a bucket list journal and record each item as you complete it
Does that give you enough ideas to start with? :)
(Made rebloggable by request.)

Defo doing this!

I want to create a life handbook so much.I’m turning 20 this year. it is probably time to get some goals in place.

xhumhallelujahx:

bryarly:

writingnotebooks:

Ooooh, I LOVE this question!

Lots of people keep journals with systematic diary entries, but I understand that it doesn’t work for everyone.

Here are some cool/interesting/fun/motivational/productive things you can do that don’t necessarily include keeping a diary:

Does that give you enough ideas to start with? :)

(Made rebloggable by request.)

Defo doing this!

I want to create a life handbook so much.
I’m turning 20 this year. it is probably time to get some goals in place.

sisterwolf:

George William (‘A.E.’) Russell

sisterwolf:

George William (‘A.E.’) Russell

I will tell you what she was like. She was like a piano in a country where everyone has had their hands cut off.
Angela Carter (via writingwillows)
its-a-writer-thing:

thewritewire:

#greattips


Every writer should read these.

its-a-writer-thing:

thewritewire:

#greattips

Every writer should read these.

theclearlydope:

The Rock fanny pack pic is now a gif … thank you Internets.
[via]

theclearlydope:

The Rock fanny pack pic is now a gif … thank you Internets.

[via]

How can I write a postmodern novel ?
Anonymous